Seafood Fried Rice

Seafood Fried Rice

It’s the first of two recipes this week!  Since my mom lived in Taiwan for a few years when she was in her 20s we grew up eating Asian food (mainly Chinese and Taiwanese) made from scratch at home.  Talk about an amazing childhood, right?  Because of that I’m super picky about my Chinese and I usually just prefer to make it myself.  Sounds complicated and too much to do, right?  I mean, how do you take a delicious ethnic food and make it yourself?  Well it’s actually super easy.  Most east Asian food is just a combination of 4 things: sauce, veggies, a protein, and rice.  Keep them separate and you’ve got the vast majority of Asian foods.  Cook them together and you’ve got fried rice.  So strap in, folks.  We’re making the most delicious fried rice you’ve ever had!

Seafood Fried Ricetime and difficulty

I hate to say it, but in reality you’re going to want a very big wok for this.  I try not to force you to purchase new equipment for these recipes, but if you’re going to make proper and delicious Asian food at home, you’re going to need a wok.  Large frying pans are the next best choice, but they’ll need to be awfully big to make up for a lack in wok.  Pots won’t work at all – while there’s going to be plenty of space to keep all the ingredients, there’s not enough surface space to fry everything.  You can heat a wok on high heat and, because of the way the wok is designed, the distribution will keep things from burning, but also keep everything hot enough to stir-fry instead of boil/burn/overcook.  A wok is generally large enough to hold all the ingredients you’ll need to make really good Asian food, unlike most saute pans.  And, lastly, a wok makes for a very healthy cooking surface – because of the way the wok is shaped you need less oil to cook than in a traditional saute pan.

So now, after that one paragraph, I’ve talked you into it and you’ve purchased the best wok you can afford, right? Good!  Then congratulations!  You are now the proud owner of one of my most-used pieces of kitchen equipment (note to self, that would be a great post someday).  Wait – you’re telling me I didn’t convince you? Blast…  Well you can still using a frying pan, it just won’t work as well.  Pick the biggest one you’ve got (not a pot, just a frying pan) and let’s chat about ingredients.

ingredients

Guys, I know you all wanted to see me make this with actual snails.  But in reality, I’m not going to.  Based on the photo and where Link picks these things up, I’m guessing they’re meant to just be shellfish.  So, from now on, any recipe containing any of the variety of snails will be substituted with shellfish, usually shrimp.  Trust me, you’ll thank me for that.  And just like the Creamy Heart Soup we have to fudge a little in the real world.

Amount of Water To Add to RiceFirst, we make the rice.  Now, my wok is huge.  My mom had one of her friends in Taiwan purchase a traditional wok for me for my birthday a few years ago and it can hold massive amounts of food.  I’m guessing you weren’t that lucky.  So I’ve toned down this recipe to fit a wok (or frying pan… sigh…) half the size of mine.  That should (fingers crossed) work out alright.  So let’s make rice, using the same directions I always post, but list in detail in the Meat and Rice Bowl recipe.  Rinse the rice several times in water, fill it up with water to your first knuckle with your finger resting lightly on top of the rice, and turn on the rice cooker. One of these days I’m going to figure out how to make rice in a pot so I can teach you all how… but it is not this day! This day we use a rice cooker!  For Gondor!

While the rice is cooking let’s chop the veggies.  Measure out your peas (they don’t need to be thawed), wash your carrots, green onions, and cabbage, and let’s get going.  Chop the carrots into larger bite-size pieces.  Peel the outer leaves off the cabbage (this may just be a personal thing) and cut the cabbage in half.  Slice into strips, turn the strips, and chop into small squares.  Cut the green onions into inch long pieces and let’s do the shrimp.

Until recently I was incredibly nervous about working with raw shrimp.  I was always afraid I would undercook it and get sick and die.  As a microbiologist raw seafood is NOT on the menu.  But once I discovered how easy it is and how delicious well-cooked shrimp is I’ll never go back.  Most shrimp is frozen and farmed.  It’s really the only way to get sustainably-sourced shrimp nowadays.  That’s totally fine.  Try to find something that still has it’s tail on but it deveined.  While I know how to devein a shrimp I can’t go into it here.  I don’t have any photos, you see, to show you.  So take your properly thawed (put them in the fridge the night before in a ziplock bag.  It’s as easy as that) shrimp and rinse them gently under cold water.  Now take each shrimp and pull the tail off.  Just place your knife along the tail, right up to where the tail meets the shell inside (so at the end of the flippers… fins?  Then just pull.  It’s super easy.  Place them all in a bowl together and now we wait.

eggs, green onions, and oilAs soon as the rice is cooked heat your wok (or frying pan) on high, as hot as your stove will go.  Add about 1-2 tablespoons oil and half the green onions.  Now, it’s important you use the right kind of oil.  You need a vegetable oil, an avocado oil, canola oil, something like that.  Olive oil has a lower smoke point so it can’t handle the high heat we’re going for.  When the green onions start popping add all the eggs and scramble until cooked.  Don’t overcook them, we still want them soft and slightly squishy.  Take them out of the pan/wok and set them aside.

Add more oil and the rest of the onions.  Add the carrots, frozen peas, and cabbage.  Stir fry (literally just stir as you fry) until the carrots are slightly tender, but not mushy.  This’ll take anywhere from 5 minutes (if you have a wok) to 10 minutes.  Take them out of the wok and again, set aside.

Add a smidgen more oil and, after 30 second or so, add the raw shrimp.  Cook for several minutes (about 3) or until they are completely pink but not overdone.  If they’re totally pink and really curling in a circle they’re probably a little overcooked.  Once they start to show a little pink add the salt and continue to stir frying until pink all the way around.

Add the veggies back in and stir everything together.  Add the rice and eggs and stir and mix until completely combined.  Add all the soy sauce and stir until well-mixed.  It’ll seem like a lot of soy sauce until it’s mixed completely.  Once it is, maybe a minute or two, it’ll even out and be much better.

Serve and get ready for the compliments!

final close up

Link’s Seafood Fried Rice

    • Rock Salt
    • Hylian Rice
    • Hearty Blueshell Snail or any Porgy

Seafood Fried Rice

  • Servings: 4 large servings
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Fried rice with shrimp, cabbage, carrots, eggs, and peas


Ingredients

  • 1.25 cups calrose (or other sushi) rice
  • water to cook rice
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 carrots
  • 1/3 head of cabbage
  • 1 bunch green onions
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 15-20 raw shrimp, tail on, deveined
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 or so tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce

Directions

  1. Rinse the rice several times in water. Level the rice, place your forefinger gently on top of the rice, and add water until the level is up to your first knuckle. Cook in a rice cooker until done.
  2. While the rice is cooking prepare the other ingredients. Measure out the peas and leave them frozen. Wash the carrots, green onions, and cabbage.
  3. Slice and chop the carrots into large bite-size pieces. Peel the outer leaves off the cabbage and cut off the top third. Slice that third into strips, turn the strips, and chop into small squares. Cut the green onions into inch long pieces.
  4. Ensure the shrimp has been thawed properly. They should be thawed in the fridge overnight in a sealed bag. Rinse the shrimp gently under cold water. Remove the tails by placing the edge of your knife along the tail, right up to where the tail meets the shell inside. Pull gently but firmly to remove the entire shrimp from the shell. Place all the shrimp in a bowl.
  5. As soon as the rice is cooked heat your wok (or frying pan) on high, as hot as your stove will go.  Add about 1-2 tablespoons oil and half the green onions. When the green onions start popping add all the eggs and scramble until cooked.  Don’t overcook them, we still want them soft and slightly squishy.  Take them out of the pan/wok and set them aside.
  6. Add more oil and the rest of the onions. Add the carrots, frozen peas, and cabbage.  Stir fry (literally just stir as you fry) until the carrots are slightly tender.  This will take anywhere from 5 minutes to 10 minutes.  Take them out of the wok and again, set aside.
  7. Add more oil and, after 30 second or so, add the raw shrimp.  Cook for several minutes (about 3) or until they are completely pink but not overdone.  If they’re totally pink and really curling in a circle they’re probably a little overcooked.  Once they start to show a little pink add the salt and continue stir frying until pink all the way around.
  8. Add the veggies back in and stir everything together.  Add the rice and eggs and stir and mix until completely combined.  Add all the soy sauce and stir until well-mixed. Serve and enjoy!

Secret Valentine: Reaper Interactive

Secret Valentine: Reaper Interactive

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!  Now, having said that I have to admit that me and my husband rarely, if ever, celebrate Valentine’s Day.  We never have (after the first embarrassing year we were dating and he ignored me completely as some kind of prank he and his friends concocted) and we probably never will.  Living in a college town for most of our relationship completely turned us off of going on dates with 1000 of our closest friends.  Having both birthdays in the same month means that yet another holiday to spend money on for gifts is not happening for budgetary reasons.  And being a complete matter-of-fact scientist means I’m not really the romantic sort (luckily, neither is he!).  However, one thing I really do love about this holiday is the fact that everyone seems just a little bit nicer to the people around them.  I always find ways to be more appreciative of those I care about and the people around me on days like today.  And with that in mind I wanted to take place in Adventure Rule’s newest community challenge: the Secret Valentine.

He took everyone who signed up, and (I’m guessing) randomly drew names from a pot to determine who was getting whom.  It was then the blogger’s job to go to their secret valentine’s blog, read their articles, and write a few kind words about them.  I was given the wonderful blog of Reaper Interactive, where the amazing @ReaperActive reigns supreme.

copyright

This is actually a blog I hadn’t read before.  I follow him on social media but hadn’t delved into his blog.  But boy am I glad I did!  This blogger is a delight to read.  He thoroughly researches his topics and is able to provide good, meaningful advice in his series articles.  For example, he wrote an article called Legals 101: Copyright and Fair Use Policy in which he delves into how bloggers, particularly game reviews can legally use images and stills from games.  He discusses copyright infringement, copyright do’s and don’t’s, and how to apply that to our blogs.  Having spent a lot of time researching copyright for my Etsy shop, and being very good friends with a lawyer who takes an interest in copyright, I was incredibly impressed by his knowledge and his ability to turn something very complex into something relatively simple for people looking for answers.  I think everyone should read this article if you’ve never thought about the legality of how you use someone else’s work.  I can’t wait for the rest of this series!

social media

He also has a great little article on traffic to your blog.  In Blogging 101: Why Your Blog May Not be Attracting Views he delves into some of the greatest mistakes we, as bloggers, can make.  These things tend to keep us away from the big views and out of the spotlight we, usually, so desperately want.  Now, a lot of times these kinds of articles are general, non-specific advice where the author is trying desperately to have something to contribute to a major blogging conversation.  Not Reaper, though.  As always with his 101 articles he swoops in with some actual, thought out advice to help people figure out a few minor tweaks that’ll make positive changes in their blog immediately.  These articles are so well-researched I really can’t say enough about them.

kindergarten

 But the main focus of Reaper’s blog is his game reviews.  Now, I’ve said before (maybe not here, but definitely said it) that I don’t really read game reviews.  I’m paranoid about story spoilers and I’d rather waste money than read them.  However, Reaper is a solid non-story-spoiler-reviewer.  And after giving in and reading a few of the reviews I love his layout.  He starts with some basic description of what the game is and then every header hits a major point people look for in a game review: Analysis, Features, System Specs required, etc…  He even provides a content warning for articles that may have some non-kid-friendly information.  My absolute favorite of his reviews is Kindergarten Can Be Fun.  It made me laugh really hard and was interesting enough that, were I PC gamer, I would definitely consider buying it.  While he’s a PC game reviewer and I don’t really play PC games (except Overwatch… little bit obsessed with that one and I hate it on PlayStation) his reviews would be top of the list if I were looking for a great new game to waste time on when I should be working.

But what it really boils down to, guys, is that Reaper is a definite blog to check out.  His humor, style, and research all make for fantastic articles and really, he’s a great person to interact with on social media!  Hey, it’s why I wound up following him on Twitter before ever reading his blog!  Happy Valentine’s Day to you, Reaper, and your amazing work!

Quick Poll and an Update

Hey, everyone! Sorry about the whole two-week-in-a-row-without-a-post thing… I’ve been trying to get one together but life keeps getting in the way. To make up for it, get ready for double recipe week! I’ll be posting two awesome recipes (and trying to get a couple in the back burner for weeks I’m swamped) this week!

And second: let’s take a poll. I’ve noticed a lot of you feel like you aren’t skilled enough to attempt these recipes. I think it would be cool to teach you, and therefore give you the confidence you need, to be skilled enough at these recipes! So I’m considering starting a twitch stream, where once a week I’d make a recipe and the instructions and details would be posted here a few days later. Thoughts? Let’s take the poll to find out! And please leave a comment or two if you have some thoughts or suggestions!

Unique Blogger Award!

Unique Blogger Award!

Alright, guys, it’s the end of the month and I haven’t posted a “Gaming Thoughts” post yet for the month of January.  So you get a blog overload this week!  But this is a fun one.  You see, NekoJonez nominated me for the Unique Blogger Award!  Yay! Fanfare, Confetti, and Balloons!  Jonez is, in all honesty, one of the nicest and most supportive bloggers out there.  And his blog is a beauty to read.  He delves deep into games to write riveting reviews and seems to always find games I’ve never heard of!  Which is a blast because it helps expand my horizons.  If you don’t already follow NekoJonez, please go do so right now and enjoy his blog as much as I do!

And now for the award.  Jonez provided we the nominees with three questions and asked us to answer them.  I thought long and hard about my responses, especially because the first question gave me so much trouble!  But I finally figured them out.

Question 1: If you were able to erase all memories from one game to be able to fully experience it again, which game would it be and why?

legend of zelda majoras mask

My first reaction to this question was Ocarina of Time.  But then my gut started to wrench and I panicked.  My childhood, my life, has been shaped by that game and my memories of playing it as a kid.  Everything about me is formed by my adoration for Link and Legend of Zelda.  And I realized I couldn’t possibly give up those memories, even for the amazing experience of getting to experience it, brand new, all over again.

But it didn’t take long to come up with the answer I do want to give: Legend of Zelda Majora’s Mask.  I had been playing OoT nearly nonstop for 2 years.  When Majora’s Mask was released I was ecstatic, thrilled to play another LoZ game.  I honestly can’t remember if I bought it myself or if my parents caved and got it for me (or, more likely, “the family”).  I remember going downstairs on a Saturday morning, opening the packaging, and literally sitting there and playing through the entire game in one day.  I would stop for bathroom breaks and food but otherwise I was glued to that TV.  When I finished it I was disappointed.  I was disappointed at how easy it had been, at the fact that it had only taken me, on a first run and having never read a manual, 13 hours to beat that game.  And I’ve never played it again.

I know it’s people’s favorite game, that it has high acclaim, and a pretty strong following.  People even claim they like it more than Ocarina of Time (the heathens!).  But I have never been able to dump the sour taste my barely-twelve-year-old mind had when I finished a LoZ game that quickly.  I’m sure I was just too young to understand the depth of the story and the complexities of gameplay that mean everyone loves it so much.  And I’d love to have the ability to do it over again.  Experience it fresh.  Having thought a lot about this the last few weeks makes me think I’m going to give it another go this year and try and capture whatever I missed as a child.

Question 2: If you were allowed to help in the production of a game, which role would you take on and why? The role of producer, voice actor, writer, designer…?

budget tempate

This one’s an easy one.  Craft Services!  Right?  Game production has craft services, the amazing people who cater the film, I mean, game… set, I mean studio… Maybe not.  Blast.  Probably not.

While I wish I could say I was super creative and had amazing story ideas/musical composition abilities… I don’t.  What I do have is an incredible attention to detail, mad budgeting skills, some past experience, and an absolute love for a good spreadsheet.  And even if she didn’t know it, LaterLevels in a recent article about game production Dream Teams, pegged the exact position I would take in the production of a game: Producer.  You see, my husband is a film producer, which gives me a bit of an edge.  I know what the position is and what is needed for it.  I’m also incredibly conscientious about money and finances.  I overlook our personal budget nearly every day and, as I like to say it, “do the math” on basically any purchase or financial whim that comes in to my head.  And my scientific background really pushes me to check out the details of how a system works and ensure that all the cogs are rolling along.  So I think that’s what I’d be best at…

Question 3: What is one of the earliest video game memories?

the lion king

My earliest video game memories are of Aladdin, The Lion King, and Sonic and Knuckles on our Sega Genesis.  I would wake up at an obscenely early time on Saturdays to play one of these three games.  As a kid I remember thinking the stampede scene in The Lion King was the most difficult level on any video game ever.  We had an unfinished basement where my parents had set up a small TV with the game systems and my little brother, sister, and I would sit down there, wrapped in blankets, and play until my parents got up, realized where we were, and would force us to come up and do our chores.  Oh, to be a child again…

And now, here are the rules for the nominees:

  1. Display the award. (See above).
  2. Thank the individual(s) who have nominated you and include a link to their blog. A little promotion for their blog is also welcome.
  3. Answer the questions asked by the individual who has nominated you.
  4. Nominate an arbitrary number of bloggers and have them answer three questions you put forth to them.

Here are the questions:

  1. If you could only listen to one game soundtrack for the rest of your life, which would it be and why?  And then pick one track from that soundtrack, which would it be, and why?
  2. Pick one villain to be the main playable character in a new game series.  Which character would you pick and why?
  3. What is one dead IP or game that you’d love to see resurrected and why?

And here are the nominees:

Video Games Nebula

My Passion for Gaming

Gamers United 

Insert Memory Card

Quite frankly, it’s rough going after Jonez because he nominated a significant portion of the people I would have nominated, who then nominated nearly all the rest.  And while it’s awesome that everyone is getting a chance, it leaves me woefully unable to nominate more…  But don’t worry!  I think I found a few who have been skipped!

Becky’s Rolls

Becky’s Rolls

This is it.  My first “Thankful” post.  I really wanted a way to highlight the people/recipe’s in my life that have made me who I am, made me a better chef/baker, blogger, or even gamer.  I want to take a minute and tell people how grateful I am for those people or those experiences.  And these posts are my way of doing that.  And it only seems fitting that I start with the woman who taught me how to bake.

Growing up with my parents meant I learned how to cook but I didn’t learn to bake.  My mom used box mixes (which isn’t a bad thing!) and we affectionately called her rolls “lead balls”.  So when I met my husband and his mom made rolls from scratch I was blown away and promptly begged her to teach me how.  I can trace my absolute love of baking bread, this obsession that I’ve cultivated and one of my favorite hobbies, to that moment in my life.  My mother-in-law, Becky, is a wonderful person.  She’s always so focused on helping people learn and supporting her children through thick and thin.  Her patience with me has been astronomical and I am so glad and grateful to be a part of her family.  So, for the passion she inspired in me and the person she is, this post is dedicated to her.

Becky’s Rollsdifficulty and time

Let’s chat for a second about types of dough.  Now, raise of hands, how many of you have heard of enriched bread vs. non-enriched bread?  Every buy bread from the store and it says “enriched” on it?  This simply means there’s some kind of fat source (like butter or oil) and usually other ingredients (i.e. eggs, milk, etc…).  If it’s not enriched it means there are 4 ingredients; flour, water, salt, and yeast.  So what kind are Becky’s rolls?  They are enriched, using milk and butter to add a light, delicate, and delicious flavor.

Now, when people think about bread they get a little flustered.  Why?  It’s the flour, water, and yeast.  The three essential ingredients in bread.  But I promise, there’s nothing to be afraid of!

First, let’s chat about water.  Contrary to popular belief, water temperature, while affecting time to rise, won’t make or break your bread (unless it’s boiling hot).  Cooler water will increase your rise time, taking longer than you expect.  Warmer water will decrease your rise time.  For enriched breads, where most of the flavor comes from the extra bits, a shorter rise time is fine.  For unenriched bread a longer rise time is preferred to develop flavor in the dough.

Second is yeast.  Yeast is a microorganism, a tiny little thing that grows when there’s a food source.  And it’ll grow and grow and keep on growing.  Add yeast to water at any temperature (again, as long as it’s not burning hot) and it’ll eventually come around.  Because it’s a living thing you just have to be patient and let it do it’s thing.  It’s not on a perfect schedule.  Be patient and it’ll eventually (or sooner) do exactly what you need it to do.

And then the flour.  The trickiest part of making bread is not adding too much flour.  If you add too much flour it soaks up all the water.  Then, when it comes time to bake, the water is already soaked up, leaving very little to evaporate, which makes your bread very dry.  The trick is to get the bread at that perfect stage of tacky, so it slightly sticks to your hands, the counter, etc. but not sticky enough to stay on your hands, the counter, etc.  Does that make sense?  If it sticks and pieces remain on your hands, it’s too wet.  If it doesn’t even cling it’s too dry.  Find the balance.

The recipe itself is pretty straight forward.  Add melted butter and powdered milk to the water.  Now, for this instance, if you can manage it, get your water to be “bath” hot.  Like, normal person bath hot, not scalded skin bath hot.  Since this is an enriched dough we don’t need a long first proof (called fermentation).  Whisk this together and then add the yeast, salt, and sugar.  Whisk a bit to get it all combined and then let it rest for about 5 minutes.  This rest step will get the yeast rising and active, making the fermentation step even shorter.  See, it’s not so bad!

bubbly yeast

Once your yeast mixture is bubbly and happy add about 1.5 cups of flour and whisk until it’s smooth.  After it’s completely smooth whisk for about 2 minutes.

whisked dough

Add flour, one cup at a time, until you get a kneadable dough.  It should take between 1-2 cups.  Then add more flour slowly as you need if and only if  you need it.  Remember, dough should be tacky but not sticky.  If it slightly sticks to your hands, it’s perfect.

Knead the dough for 2 minutes or until it passes the “windowpane test”.  To knead, simply press the heal of your hand into the bulk of the dough, fold the dough in half, turn it a quarter turn, and do it again.  Repeat, using one or both hands, until it feels nice and firm.  If you know what the windowpane test it, then you can check your bread this way.  Otherwise, we are just going to skip it until I make the Wheat Bread for a BotW recipe.

Put a small bit of oil in the bottom of a bowl and rotate the dough in the oil to coat all sides.  Keep the dough in the bowl and cover with a towel or cloth to ferment until double.  Now, this time will be different based on elevation of where you live, humidity, and room temperature.  In Utah, where I live, this step only takes 40 minutes.  In coastal California, it could take and hour.  The important thing is to watch the dough and only move on when it’s doubled.  If you do anything before it’s doubled the rolls will be dry and difficult to swallow.

Once it’s doubled cut the dough in half.  Gently fold over the dough to make a circle, then roll it out into a circle.  Cut the dough (I use a pizza cutter because it’s easy!) into 8 triangles.  Then just roll up the trianges into crescent shapes and place it on a greased baking sheet.  Lather, rinse, repeat for the remaining dough.  You should have 16 beautiful rolls!

Cover these with a kitchen towel and allow to proof until double, again.  While they are proofing, preheat the oven to 425F.  Once the rolls are ready just pop them in the oven for about 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown.

browned and delicious

Enjoy warm with large amounts of salted butter or however you like!  It’s rolls… you can’t really go wrong.

Becky's Rolls

  • Servings: 16
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Soft, white dinner rolls


Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1.5 tablespoons dry active yeast
  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1.5 cups hot (bath temperature) water
  • 1/8 cup plus 1.5 tablespoons powdered milk
  • 2.5-4 cups all-purpose flour

Directions

  1. Stir together the Add melted butter, powdered milk, and water. Whisk in yeast, salt, and sugar.
  2. Allow mixture to rest for 5 minutes. It should be bubbly at the end of the rest period.
  3. Add about 1.5 cups of flour and whisk until it’s smooth.  After it’s completely smooth whisk for about 2 minutes.
  4. Add flour, one cup at a time, until you get a kneadable dough.  It should take between 1-2 cups.  Then add more flour slowly if needed. The dough should be tacky but not sticky.
  5. Knead the dough for 2 minutes or until it passes the windowpane test.  To knead, simply press the heal of your hand into the bulk of the dough, fold the dough in half, turn it a quarter turn, and do it again.  Repeat, using one or both hands, until it feels nice and firm.
  6. Put a small bit of oil in the bottom of a bowl and rotate the dough in the oil to coat all sides.  Keep the dough in the bowl and cover with a towel or cloth to ferment until double.
  7. Once it’s doubled cut the dough in half.  Gently fold over the dough to make a circle, then roll it out into a circle.  Cut the dough into 8 triangles.  Roll up the trianges into crescent shapes and place it on a greased baking sheet.  Repeat until you have 16 rolls.
  8. Cover the rolls with a kitchen towel and allow to proof until double.
  9. While rolls are proofing, preheat the oven to 425F.  Once the rolls are ready pop them in the oven for about 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown.

Fried Egg and Rice

Fried Egg and Rice

It’s a breakfast kind of few weeks, I guess.  I’ve been slightly ignoring those recipes simply because I like to eat what I make and I really enjoy baking for breakfast.  Muffins, quick breads, waffles, pancakes, biscuits… Eggs aren’t exactly my thing.  But after this recipe eggs may be back on the mark for being my thing.  It was so delicious I even had it for lunch today.  So spoiler alert, if you like eggs and rice and happiness, you’ll love this!

Fried Egg and Ricedifficulty and time

This one is super easy, guys.  I’m going to give you the instructions for a single egg serving since that’s the pretty picture, but in reality you’ll want 2 eggs.  At least, I did.  And while there’s not really a sauce in the photo, I added one because I think eggs need more than just salt and pepper.

ingredients list

Amount of Water To Add to RiceLet’s start with the rice.  It’s as simple as “make your rice.”  Now, getting a little more complicated, I use a rice cooker exclusively.  I usually make about 2 cups of uncooked rice (which fluffs up to about 6 cups) at a time and then just refrigerate the rest for anything.  Tomorrow’s breakfast, fried rice, whatever.  It’s easy to use up extra rice.  But whether you make a lot or a little we are going to follow the instructions I mentioned in Meat and Rice Bowl recipe.  We start with good, proper sticky rice, usually some kind of sushi rice.  My favorite is Calrose from a childhood raised on it.  Rinse your rice three times to get rid of the super starchy outer coat, and then add water up to the first knuckle on your finger.  Turn on your rice cooker and let it go!

Now, we don’t want to start anything else until the rice is done, since the eggs cook so quickly.  So once the rice is done and sitting warm let’s get going!  You can add either butter or oil to the pan.  If oil, just enough to coat the bottom, and if, like me, you choose butter for the flavor and the slight fluffiness it gives eggs, then you’ll want 1/2 tablespoon per egg.  Turn your pan on to a medium low heat.  We don’t want anything too hot or the outer edges of the egg will cook far quicker than the center and you’ll end up with overcooked egg.  Place the butter in the pan and wait until it completely melts.  Once it does very carefully break your egg (or eggs) into the pan.  It’s very important that you are careful, because we want these eggs sunny-side-up, which mean the yolk needs to be intact.  If the yolk breaks, you may want to throw the egg away and start over.  It won’t be nearly as good without a runny yolk!  One way to make sure the yolk stays together is to crack your egg against a flat surface, like the counter, and then use two hands to gently pull it apart and slide it into the pan.  That’s how I do it!  If you break a few, no worries, you’ll get the hang of it!

bubbling egg edges

Once the egg is cracked and cooking we need to keep the heat at the perfect temperature.  It needs to be hot enough that the edges of the egg are bubbling a bit but cool enough that only the edges are bubbling.  Add the salt and pepper at this point, before the egg is set, and cook for 2-3 minutes.  If it looks like the center isn’t cooking at all the the outer edges are cooking too quickly just place a lid on the pan for about 30 seconds-1 minute to steam the center a bit.  Don’t leave the lid on too long or you’ll end up with over-easy eggs, not what we are looking for!

While the eggs are cooking measure out your soy sauce and add the ginger and garlic salt and stir until combined.  Pour the soy sauce on the bottom of a plate.  Add about 1-1.5 cups of cooked rice to the plate on top of the sauce.  When the egg(s) are cooked gently slide them from the pan on to the rice. Sprinkle with fresh, chopped chives.

close up of egg

Enjoy it while it’s hot!  And keep your pan ready… you may want seconds!

Link’s Fried Egg and Rice

    • Bird Egg
    • Hylian Rice

Fried Egg and Rice

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Sunny-side-up eggs over a bed of rice and ginger garlic soy sauce


Ingredients

  • 1 egg (you’ll probably want 2)
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter (1 if you cook 2 eggs)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/3 calrose rice
  • enough water to cover rice up to first knuckle on finger
  • 1/8 plus 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground garlic
  • 1/8 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chives (or 1/2 tablespoon dried chives)

Directions

  1. Rinse your rice three times. Place your finger gently on top of the rice and add water until the water level reaches your first knuckle joint. Turn on your rice cooker and wait until complete.
  2. Heat your pan on medium low and melt butter.
  3. Carefully crack your egg into the pan, ensuring the yolk stays intact. If the yolk breaks, you may want to throw the egg away and start over.
  4. Keep the heat on medium-low but adjust if necessary. It needs to be hot enough that the edges of the egg are bubbling a bit but cool enough that only the edges are bubbling.
  5. Add the salt and pepper at this point, before the egg is set.
  6. Cook for 2-3 minutes.  If it looks like the center isn’t cooking at all the the outer edges are cooking too quickly just place a lid on the pan for about 30 seconds-1 minute to steam the center a bit.
  7. While the eggs are cooking measure out your soy sauce and add the ginger and garlic salt and stir until combined.
  8. Pour the soy sauce on the bottom of a plate.  Add about 1-1.5 cups of cooked rice to the plate on top of the sauce.
  9. When the egg(s) are cooked gently slide them from the pan on to the rice. Sprinkle with fresh, chopped chives.

Omelet

Omelet

Let’s start with the basics.  A) because in order to make a good omelet in the future it’s good to know the basic skills from the start, and B) because it’s the end of the week and I still haven’t done a recipe for the week…. Hey, at least I’m being honest, right?

This recipe is super easy to get right and super easy to get wrong.  Eggs are notoriously easy to overcook and you really want to pull them off the heat before they’re completely cooked.  Since they continue cooking after you take them off the heat you can prevent overcooking simply by following that one rule.  So, let’s make sure you get it right and get right down to the recipe!

Omeletomelet meter

Let’s start with prepping everything.  Since eggs cook so quickly it’s important to keep everything right at hand at all times.  A few seconds can be the difference between rubbery, overcooked mush and a perfect, fluffy, delicious omelet.  So gather your eggs, salt, pepper, olive oil, and butter and let’s go!

omelet ingredients

Heat your heavy-bottomed pan over medium heat.  Now, the pan size will make a difference with how many eggs you use.  This recipe calls for 3 eggs and an 8 inch-ish pan.  This will make for a fluffier, thicker omelet.  If you use 2 eggs, you obviously use less butter, but it will make a big difference to the final product to use a smaller pan, as well.  The second thing to note is that we cook eggs on medium.   This is an important step.  Yes, it takes longer to cook things on medium but cooking eggs any higher runs the risk of burning, overcooking, cooking too quickly, and a sub-par breakfast.   Who knew a pan could make such a big difference with something as simple as eggs, right?  Lightly oil the pan by pouring some oil in and using a paper towel to sweep it around the entire pan and mop up any if you happen to pour in too much (as I usually do!).  Add the butter and gently tilt the pan to coat the pan with melting butter.

While the butter is melting crack your eggs and whip some air into them with a fork.  Just break the yolks and keep whisking until well-mixed.  There shouldn’t be any long stretches of any yolk or albumen remaining.

Once the butter is bubbling add the eggs all at once.  Tilt the pan to evenly distribute the eggs and allow to cook for 1-2 minutes.  Every once in a while gently tilt the pan to distribute the egg that hasn’t set yet.

When the eggs are nearly set add the salt and pepper.  Now, when I say nearly set I mean there’s a bit of a wobble to them.  There shouldn’t be any raw-looking bits but it shouldn’t be stiff or completely cooked through yet.  This is that all-important step I mentioned in the beginning.  Overcook at this point and your omelet won’t impress.

As soon as you add the salt and pepper tilt the pan away from you and, using a spatula, fold the edge closest to you over the rest of the omelet.  Once the omelet is flipped it won’t unstick from itself but who cares what it looks like as long as it’s delicious!  And with practice, flipping will produce perfectly shaped omelet’s every time!  Now, one last thing, when you add the omelet to the plate don’t get any of the butter.  It’ll just make the omelet taste like butter instead of eggs.  So gently lift the omelet out of the pan, leaving all the butter, and place it on your plate.  Enjoy with toast, muffins, fried tomatoes, whatever your heart desires and enjoy!

final omelet

Link’s Omelet

    • Bird Egg

Basic Omelet

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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A basic omelet with salt and pepper


Ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Heat a heavy-bottomed pan over medium heat. For three eggs a good size pan would be 8 inches. Lightly oil the pan by pouring in the olive oil and sweeping it around the entire pan using a paper towel.
  2. Add the butter to the pan and gently tilt the pan to coat the pan with melting butter.
  3. While the butter is melting, crack your eggs and whip some air into them with a fork.  Whisk until completely mixed.
  4. Once the butter is bubbling add the eggs all at once.  Tilt the pan to evenly distribute the eggs and allow to cook for 1-2 minutes.  Every once in a while gently tilt the pan to distribute the egg that hasn’t set yet.
  5. When the eggs are nearly set add the salt and pepper.
  6. As soon as you add the salt and pepper tilt the pan away from you and, using a spatula, fold the edge closest to you over the rest of the omelet. Serve with your favorite breakfast foods!