Blogger Blitz Round 4: Matchmaker

You know, after an accidental hiatus it’s interesting that the post I come back with isn’t a recipe.  It’s not even a Thursday Thought.  It’s a competition.  So to kick off being back from vacation and back on track I’m going to spend the next 500 words (after this intro, judges!  Don’t start counting now!) convincing you that Link, our very own Hero of Life, the Universe, and Everything can play matchmaker with only his impressive collection of skills.  This competition, hosted by Ian at Adventure Rules, is called the Blogger Blitz.  If you want to know more about it a link to the rules can be found here.  I’m participating in Round 4, so if you’d like to read the previous rounds click on 1, 2, and 3 for the respective hub articles.  This community event has been really fun to be a part of so far, and, with luck, I’ll get to keep playing in the next round!  For any of you who, for some silly reason, don’t want to read the full rules and regulations, my prompt is as follows:

“Match Maker! It’s a mission to find love for a malboro, the most horrifying creature in Final Fantasy history. Malboro are known for their putrid breath, breath so terrible that when exhaled on a party of adventurers, it can cause a range of status ailments from poison to confusion to becoming Doomed to die! Finding someone – or something – for a creature like that is pretty intimidating, but it’s up to you to convince the judges why your character can do it.”

malboro

If you want to read my competitor’s argument head over to Gamer’s United.  Luna is writing about the Joker so this could be a very interesting match-up!  Oh, and one more thing, the results will be posted on Adventure Rules this Friday to see who won!  So cross your fingers, wish me luck, and let’s get this party started!  Judges, word counts starts at the top the of the next paragraph.

“Hey! Listen! Link, it’s almost time for the challenge.  Wake Up!”

*Mumbling and yawning*

“I can’t believe I picked such a lazy boy to help me with this… Link, it’s challenge day!  Can you explain the argument we came up with that you are an incredible matchmaker and that you can help anyone find love?”

“. . . . .”

“Um…. A little louder for the back?”

“. . . . .”

*Sigh* “Fine.  Why don’t I just tell them.”

Link, The legend of Zelda

Link, the Hero of Time and defender of Hyrule, has always been up to a challenge.  When he heard about this one it was no different.  He knew that finding love for a creature as horrific as a malboro would be tough, but he’s never backed down from a fight and he never will.

First, Link must use his triforce of courage.  Only the most brave and fearless could stand to be near a malboro long enough to learn what he was really like.  Link’s ability to stay calm in the face of overwhelming danger would allow him to hang out, learn, and find the positive aspects of such a creature.  Link’s incessant questions to everyone, including asking the same questions over and over again, would allow him to discover who malboro truly was.  This knowledge would be invaluable to finding a true love for this monster.  He would also utilize his companion, be it fairy, sword spirit, or twilight princess, to learn everything he could about malboros.  He would learn the creature’s weaknesses in order to help the potential mate know when it was safe to approach their true love.

After learning about his foe… I mean, friend… he would start to search for the right person to love such a monster.  Link loves to travel, usually covering vast countries and lands to discover everything he can about other people, cultures, and races.  This knowledge will help him choose the person most likely to love a malboro.  After using his persistence and questioning skills he will have found the person just right for the malboro – looking for love and slightly desperate.

moe the moblinOnce the potential soul mate has been found he’d start a letter campaign, knowing that the best way to get these two to fall in love would be long-distance.  So he’d deliver these letters back and forth between the lover’s, like he’s always done.  He reminded me that every incarnation of himself has played matchmaker regardless of race, age, and distance.  He even reminded me that his incarnation during the flood (Wind Waker) was able to match a Hylian with a Moblin monster.

He’s always helping people find love and it usually bring him great joy and some kind of reward.  The promise of this reward means that he would not give up until the quest was completed.  These letters would spark true romance and, after enough of them, the malboro and his true love would finally meet.  Armed with the knowledge Link was able to pass on these two could live happily, and maybe distantly, ever after.

It’s Okay to be a Hero

It’s Okay to be a Hero

Lets chat for a bit about heroes.  The new, modern, trendy, super cool, trench coat-wearing thing nowadays is anti-heroes.  Batman, Joel from The Last of Us, Aloy from Horizon Zero Dawn.  All these characters are dark, mysterious, brooding, kind of morally ambiguous, and dreamy.  It seems that the media and critics are obsessed with the anti-hero and anything even remotely resembling a hero is a boring trope that’s obviously been done before.

But you know who I love?  The hero.  I love Link, Mario, and Captain America.  I love the brightness, the hope, the radiating goodness that pours out of a hero and into our lives.  Heroes are absolutely still relevant and, especially in these dark times, still necessary in our games, movies, and media.

So what’s the exact difference, you may ask?  Well let’s check Wikipedia – because that’s what we do nowadays.

A hero is defined as a “person or main character who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through impressive feats and ingenuity, bravery, or strength, often sacrificing their own personal concerns for the greater good”.  Let’s break it down.  A hero is someone who utilizes their natural abilities to overcome evil.  They are always found giving up what they want to help others and are good, true, honest, and kind.  These characters always do the right thing and have a fantastic moral compass.

An anti-hero is a “protagonist who lacks conventional heroic qualities such as idealism, courage, or morality.  Although anti-heroes may sometimes do the right thing, it is often for the wrong reasons and because it serves their self-interest rather than being driven by moral convictions”.  So these are the people who fight against the system, break the rules, live by their own code, and do their own thing.  And somehow they usually end up doing the right thing for the people around them.  But it’s not always the best way to do it or the best reasons.

Because anti-heroes are much more flawed and much more like us they tend to be more loved.  They appeal to us because we relate to their circumstances, they struggles, and dilemmas.

But…

Just because a character is a hero doesn’t mean they’re flat.  Or outdated.  Or boring.  It just means they are a good person with good morals who does good things for people.  It’s because they are heroes that makes them people we should emulate.  I mean, add a couple of cut scenes of Batman sneaking through a window with an ax and this just became a horror film.  Instead of focusing on the parts of a hero no one feels they can relate to, lets focus on the fact that these are characters we can strive to be!

My sister-in-law and I have this debate semi-regularly.  She is a hard-core anti-hero fan and I am a die-hard hero worshiper.  It’s why she loves Brontë and I love Austen.  Why she loves Rogue One instead of Force Awakens and I… well I love both.  And I wish I could help her understand that a character doesn’t need to be an anti-hero to be worthy of praise or positive critique.

Lord David Cecil once said (when talking about Austen’s novels, but let’s be honest, it can be applied to any hero character, “There are those who do not like [heroes]; as there are those who do not like sunshine or unselfishness”.  These character’s can bring light and happiness into our lives and into our perspectives.  Instead of focusing on the flaws and negativity and selfishness we are given the option to look at the selflessness, the integrity, the courage of characters doing the right thing because it’s the right thing.  Link saving Hyrule in every iteration simply because he’s in the right circumstances.  Mario rescuing the kidnapped girl and freeing countless worlds from the clutches of tyrants.  These are the people with hope and the ones who can teach us to hope.

The website Literary Devices explains that “in modern society when we are presented with a character that is overly righteous and upright, we find it too good to be true. The social turmoil that the entire world as a community has been facing recently has disposed us to be skeptical of almost everything. . . So, we relate better to a character that has suffered through life and has both good and bad sides than a character that is only seen doing good.”  And maybe that’s true, but I like to believe there’s some good left in this world and that heroes exemplify who we can become in order to make things right!

Who are your favorite heroes?  Or, if you prefer anti-heroes, which is your favorite and why?

P.S: Special shout out to the artist Kurama805 on DeviantArt for the artwork I used as my featured image!  This is a downloadable wallpaper and is gorgeous!

Changing the World One Gamer at a Time

Changing the World One Gamer at a Time

As gamers I think we have so much potential for changing the world.  I actually, legitimately do.  The more I think about gaming the more convinced I am that it’s a great metaphor for the world – there are different people from different countries, ethnicity’s, backgrounds, financial situations, and preferences interacting on a daily basis.  We meet up in online chats for all sorts of games and we experience this thing we love together.  And that, I think, gives us a positive advantage over so many other people.  The skills we learn while gaming can help, to use a bit of a cliche, make the world a better place.  Here are 5 reasons why I truly believe that:

Gaming online can help with positive social interaction:

When you interact with someone new it can be daunting, intimidating, and unfamiliar.  It’s so much easier to bond with people who enjoy the same things you do and who, frankly, you don’t have to look in the eye when you chat.  Instead of using online chat and online gaming as a toxic dumping grounds of sadness try using it to build positive social interaction.  Treat it like you would if that person where sitting right next to you gaming, instead of sitting 600 miles or more away.  Talk, be kind and understanding, helpful instead of hurtful.  Take the opportunity to instruct in a positive way instead of criticizing and bond over the fact that you both love playing as D.Va.  This will translate to how you treat people offline, as well.  The kindness we show becomes a part of us and helps mold our interactions everywhere.  We, because we are with people who love the same things we do, have a unique opportunity to encourage and uplift!  Let’s try and make someone’s day just a bit better by being a person worth knowing.

Games can help us understand other cultures:

I love how much I learn about Japanese culture when I play JRPGs.  Or the minor insights I get when I read bio’s on Overwatch.  It incites my curiosity and makes me want to actually learn more about the real cultures!  I don’t know about you guys, but I see that kind of infectious appetite to learn about the people and cultures that are deep within our games all around me.  Learning about others helps us become more tolerant of them, more accepting of who they are, and less critical of why they choose to be certain ways.  So take a leaf out of your own book and go learn about other people, both on and off screen.  Ask someone in chat about why their name is unfamiliar.  Read up on why a particular animation was used for a particular game.  Learn something new and I bet it’ll make you love not only your game, but also those people, a lot more!

Games can help break down prejudice toward other preferences and points of view:

I love that the entire Zelda franchise has no qualms about inter-race relationships.  Ruto, princess of the Zora’s in Ocarina of Time, falls in love with Link, a Hylian.  A Hylian and a Gerudo wind up getting married in Breath of the Wild.  Nintendo acts like it’s no big deal – and it isn’t.  There are so many subtle and not-so-subtle points in a story that can help break down social barriers against any kind of prejudice.  This includes sexual preference, gender identity, religious beliefs, and cultural “norms”.  Everyone in the games get along based on a scale of good and evil, not a scale of differences.  These messages are ingrained in us from childhood (those of us who grew up gaming) and are something we can easily translate from the screen to the real world.  Lets become more like these characters and become more accepting, loving, and kind toward others.  Because what they identify as or what they choose to be should not define whether they are a good person.

Goal setting and goal achieving can help our outlook on life:

Raise your hands if you’ve ever felt better about yourself after completing goal?  Me, too.  It has some serious motivating power and can help us feel 1,000 times better about how we are doing in our lives.  Now, I know this is a mechanic developers use to try and get it hooked but achieving small goals in games can help us achieve goals in real life, too.  Whether you are accomplishing a task in a game, at the gym, or at work the feelings of happiness and the endorphin rush are the same.  And this motivates you to set and achieve even more goals.  It’s a fantastic positive feedback loop.  All we need to do is take that high we get when we finish that side quest and, when we turn off the game, use it to finish something else.  Finishing that other thing will make you more likely to finish other side quests, or other real life goals.  Lather, rinse, repeat and you’re an unstoppable force of awesome.

Stories can positively affect our outlook on the world around us:

How many games do you play that follow this format: some kind of evil took over the world/destroyed it, and now you have to rebuild/figure out what the evil is/fight the darkness threatening the world/etc…  Horizon Zero Dawn, any of the Arkham series, and the entire Zelda franchise follow this, along with a myriad of other games.  You know what this says to me?  The world has been and can again be messed up.  But you know what happens when it becomes like this?  People step in and clean up the messes.  Most of the time these stories involve some kind of destiny surrounding the hero, but not all of them.  And that’s great because we, just our regular selves, can affect positive change on our surroundings!  We can be the good neighbor who makes someone’s day a little better.  We can take small steps to fight the enemies surrounding us and help make the world a more positive place, not more despondent.  We should take the lessons we learn in our games and know that the work we do in the real world can make a difference in overcoming the darkness that threatens us.

So let’s do it!  Let’s become the positive change we want to see in the world.  We’re already being trained with the skills to make a difference because of our love of gaming.  Why don’t we use that love and make the world a happier, safer, more accepting place to be.

 

A Girl in a Game Store

A Girl in a Game Store

As a female in the gaming world I have come across some weird behaviors over the years.  But very few compare to the different ways guys react to me when they see me in a game store alone.  Bordering on insulting, these hilarious run-ins prompted me to make a list of 5 navigational pitfalls that easily ruin a first impression.

The One-Upping Competition:

This one is so hard to avoid.  The guy wants to prove he knows more than the girl because of a, b, and c.  The girl wants to prove she knows the most because of x, y, and z.  Instead of interacting with each other and creating a bond that could be the start of a beautiful friendship they wind up arguing.  It goes from friendly banter to nit-picking in a heartbeat.  And the last place you want a relationship to start is with a fight.  Turn of vs. mode and play team mode for a while.  I bet you’ll like where it leads.

The Game Developer Stratagem:

Once Upon A Time I was waiting in line outside a GameStop with my little brother for the Nintendo Switch release.  It was now about 7 am and this girl shows up.  She stood at the front of the crowd of (mostly) men and said “I’m a game developer and I’d really love everyone’s opinions about what makes a good story”.  She batted her eyelashes, whipped her hair (probably…) and it worked – the first 10 boys or so fawned over her.  That is, until her boyfriend showed up and ruined the illusion that they might actually have a chance with her.  Every time I see this technique get used all I can think of is “Are you peacocking?  Really?  Do you think that’s gonna work?”.  People, get real.  Stop actively looking for attention and just be honest about what you really want.  I’m guessing people will appreciate it a lot more since they will, inevitably, find out the truth.

The Better Gamer Attempt:

Why is it that so many guys in a game store think that I need help playing my game?  Why do they feel compelled to give me hints even after I firmly state that I don’t want any help?  It’s because I’m a girl.  Because they want to impress the opposite sex with their “obvious” superiority and knowledge.  This method is, above almost all others, the most annoying because I don’t like spoilers!  And I’m guessing most people feel the same way.  So just stop it!  If there’s a girl (or guy, for that matter.  I’m sure it goes both ways) in a game store by herself who doesn’t look lost, she probably knows what she’s doing.  And instead of treating her like she’s clueless try engaging her in genuine equal conversation.  It’ll probably get you way further than assuming you know more than she does.

The Gawk and Cover:

Ha!  I love this one.  Not for use, mind you, since it doesn’t work at all, but because of how funny it is.  It’s so awkward to be wandering around the game store and see the one guy/girl following you with their eyes but ducking out of sight whenever you notice.  Fellow gamers, have a little more confidence in yourself!  Make Link your spirit animal and channel the triforce of courage!  Try and talk to them because the worst they can do is say no and if you don’t talk to them you’ll never know.  The unapproachable She/He will probably be more interested in your well-informed and interesting game opinions than they are about whatever it is that bothers you about yourself.  And if they aren’t trust me when I say they are flattered by the attention whether they go for it or not.  I always am!

The Damsel in Distress:

Ugh.  This strategy.  Just walk into any game store and you can see this method being utilized.  “Oh help me!  I don’t know anything and I’d love some big, strong man to figure it out for me”… Here’s the reason this method isn’t worth the attempt.  There are two reasons why a girl is in a game store: A) she’s married to/dating a gamer, isn’t a gamer herself, and is genuinely looking for help.  She isn’t sure what she needs or how to find it but dudes, she’s taken.  And B) she’s just looking for attention but trust me, she knows as much as you or more and you’ll get a rude awakening when you find out she faked it.  Women of the world, instead of trying to mask how much we really know and how much we love gaming, why don’t we own it and approach these gentlemen as equals instead of inferior beings.  It’ll probably get you farther in a relationship because you’ll actually have something to build on rather than something to hide.

What awkward encounters have you guys encountered in the wild?  Did I miss any that you’ve experienced?

 

Thursday Thoughts: E3 Edition

Thursday Thoughts: E3 Edition

With E3 slowly winding down and coming to a close I wanted to join the hundreds of people expressing their feelings on the turn out this year.  I know quite a few of my fellow gamer-bloggers have been live-blogging E3 this year.  I appreciate their stamina and insight, particularly because it allowed me to skip a lot of it due to other conflicts.  If you want a really good exploration of a lot of the showcases I highly recommend Adventure Rules.  His posts made me laugh and were pretty good at capturing the feel of the presentations.

Bethesda:  Let’s start with one I didn’t watch.  Thanks to Ian, my little brother, and my brother-in-law I got a pretty good idea of what happened.  It made me feel very lucky that I didn’t stay up for it… Nothing was announced that sparked my interest, including Skyrim for Switch, because, frankly, that guy stealing Link’s stuff was just weird to me.

Microsoft:  I don’t own an Xbox and I probably won’t ever own an Xbox.  But their overwhelming focus on something that’ll be difficult for people to afford utilizing technology hardly anyone can afford painted them into a serious corner.  So what if your console has 4K resolution?  Are you going to drop $500.00 on a new console only to play it on your TV that’s still 1080P?  In order for this truly to work you’ve got to spend the thousands on a new TV, and then buy the console, and then buy only the games that have 4K capability!  Am I impressed with the technology they presented?  Of course!  It’s a huge leap forward.  But do I honestly think it’s going to work out for them?  I think that’s an obvious no…  At least not right now.

Ubisoft:  I’m not an Assassin’s Creed fan.  I know the stories are pretty interesting, in general, but I think the gameplay is pretty boring.  I didn’t even like Black Flag despite the fact that you’re a pirate and pirate’s were in that year.  But an ancient Egyptian storyline has so much potential!  I think I’ll still feel the same way about the gameplay and, frankly, even with the coolest concepts Ubisoft hasn’t delivered on a storyline I care about.  But then there’s Mario + Rabbids.  It looked like a mixture of straight-up weird and cool.  I couldn’t tell what my feelings were on this one.  At first I pushed back, thinking it was something I would never play.  But the more I see of it, the more willing I am to give it a chance.  It’s a Mario game, after all.

EA:  Confession time: I love Star Wars.  When I went to my very first Comic Con and saw Dave Prowse I started crying because I was so overwhelmed.  He thought that was pretty cool and invited me and my family to dinner with him and Peter Mayhew.  Definitely worked out in my favor.  So when I see a newer and much, much better Battlefront coming, I get excited.  Nothing else really stood out, but Star Wars is always worth it for me.

PlayStation:  Every year my brother-in-law throws a PlayStation party where we gamers come together and watch the showcase.  This year we even had a game.  Each of us wrote down a list of games we thought they’d present and there was a point system and everything.  I don’t always play something other than Nintendo, but when I do, I play PlayStation (keep gaming, my friends), so I was pretty interested in what they’d be showing.  However, since I don’t play it very often, PlayStation would have to show something incredible to get me excited… But that didn’t happen.  I didn’t see anything that blew me away.  Even the new Uncharted, a series I actually love, didn’t appeal because I really don’t like Chloe!  What surprised me, though, was how little the people around me cared.  All the games we had guessed and games we were excited for weren’t discussed and the gameplay didn’t wow.  Though I admit, the zombear was pretty awesome.  Luckily they closed with Spider-man, which has some serious potential for making the Arkham fanbase happy.

Nintendo:  Now for the cream!  I don’t know what I was expecting from this but it wasn’t what we got.  Other than the weird voice-over for Xenoblade 2 (seriously, what was that?), they blew me away with their animation, titles, color, and excitement.  A new Pokemon RPG, a new Metroid, the Breath of the Wild DLC, a new Kirby, an amazing-looking Yoshi, followed up with Super Mario Odyssey.  It was like eye candy and happiness had a baby.  I’m so excited for nearly every single thing they announced and now I’m anxious for it all to get released!  I’m so excited for these games it feels like I’m a kid again.

So who, in my opinion, “won” E3?  I think that’s not really a fair question.  Everyone has different tastes, opinions, and ideas about what they want from their gaming experience.  I am a pretty exclusive Nintendo gamer so Microsoft (obviously) didn’t appeal to me and, while I enjoy PlayStation games and the stories they tell I wasn’t wowed by anything they brought to the table this year.  So it’s pretty fair to say Nintendo, with their colors, graphics, lack of mindless intro’s, and announcements of some new heavy hitters was my absolute favorite.  But it was last year, too, when the only thing they talked about was Breath of the Wild.  I think, based on preferences determined by a quick poll at my laboratory of all the serious gamers there, everyone got pretty excited about something someone was releasing.  Which means that, to me, E3 itself was the winner, bringing another year of excellent games to excellent platforms that appeal to a wide audience of gamers.

So what did you guys think?  Any games you’re super excited to play?

The Completionist’s Dilemma

The Completionist’s Dilemma
Warning- this post may contain a few minor spoilers for completionists

I’ve always been a completionist when I play Zelda.  I complete every side quest, open every chest, get the highest possible tier in every game, collect every item, explore literally every nook and cranny, and, up to this point, cut every blade of grass and pick up every single rock.  I love the feeling of mastering a game, of knowing it inside and out, and of feeling like I gave it everything I have.  So when I started playing Breath of the Wild there was never any question of whether I would collect all the Korok seeds, explore every area thoroughly, and complete as many missions as they threw at me.

I started with a game plan: I would explore every new tower area completely and 100% before I unlocked the next area.  It was the only way to ensure that I didn’t miss anything.  I block off the new area before I activate the tower and then I start exploring.  Literally every single square foot is explored before I move on to the next tower.  I slowly move my boundary inward until I have seen all the amazing, incredible landscape and admired every lovingly-rendered scene.  If I see anything suspicious that I haven’t figured out yet, I stamp it and come back to it once I’ve had time to figure it out.

File_000

It’s been a fantastic way to see everything.  I have definitely gotten hours of excitement and enjoyment from this game I would have missed if I had focused on the story alone.  It’s nice to be the one my little brother questions when he can’t find a shrine and it’s fun to feel like I gave the developers the exploration they were intending.

But sometimes it’s a struggle.  When I climb yet another craggy peak at Death Mountain it can get boring and tedious.  When I run across yet another empty field, zig-zagging until the entire thing has been viewed I wonder what I’m doing with my life.  And when I accidentally notice how many hours I’ve played and I’ve barely finished half the map I worry about my life choices.  Sometimes I worry that, by choosing to play the game this way, I’m losing all the spontaneity and pure excitement that comes from random exploration.  And, frankly, sometimes I worry that people are judging me for not spending my time the way they think I should.

File_002

So there’s the dilemma… What I am doing vs. what I feel I should be doing vs. what other people do.  It’s been hard.  Sometimes I don’t want to keep playing because Hyrule field took forever to explore and there was literally nothing there.  And sometimes I get bored climbing and climbing and waiting in the rain to do yet more climbing just to get to the top of spires that don’t contain a single item.  But when I find something all the spark and energy come flowing back.  It’s rewarding to find a Korok seed in some random area I never would have explored.  It’s awesome to be obsessed with killing every Lynel only to find out there’s a medal for doing so.  It’s breathtaking to find a view you never would have seen unless you were in the right place at the right time.

And you know what – it doesn’t matter what people think and how other people play the game.  This is your game and your experience.  Don’t let anyone take that away from you!  They can keep their judgy comments to themselves  because this brings you joy and life is about having joy.  However you choose to play the game, just do it!  Because Zelda is about adventure and someone else’s adventure should never take away your adventure.

So has it been worthwhile to become a 100% completionist for Breath of the Wild.  You bet.  I wouldn’t change this experience for the anything.

So how about the rest of you?  Are there any completionists out there pushing for 100% like me?  Have you been working a different strategy to make sure you get every piece of awesome you can?

 

A strong, female playable character in Legend of Zelda

A strong, female playable character in Legend of Zelda

I wish more video games had strong female leads.  Having said that, I’m definitely not one of those people who needs a strong female to take over every male role.  In the immortal words of George R R Martin “To me being a feminist is about treating men and women the same” (Salter, The Telegraph, 2013).  There should be, and needs to be, a balance.  There are games that should be about male characters, and that’s okay!  And there are games that should be about female characters, and that’s also okay!

 

What I don’t like is the trend of taking a male character, turning them into a female character, and calling it “good enough”.  We don’t need yet another female who reminds us more of our brother than ourselves.  What we need is a character who is a woman who was meant to be a woman.  With that in mind, I don’t need Link to be a girl.  I need Link to continue to be a boy (because he so obviously is) and I need a game from Zelda’s point of view.

Zelda is already the strong, intelligent, awesome female character we need in the Legend of Zelda series.  She is brave, always fighting alongside Link, like she does as Sheik or Tetra.  She is fleshed out, created as a person with thoughts, opinions, and struggles, as is so poignantly brought home in the memories of Link in Breath of the Wild.  And, more importantly, she’s been there from the beginning.  This is not some character Nintendo would create out of nothing to prove to the public that they, too, care about women.  This would be a way for them to show that, from the beginning, they have cared about women.  It would be a way to prove that, just because their main hero in this series is male, it doesn’t mean they had a completely chauvinistic point of view.  I mean, these are the people who created Zelda’s Adventure, one of the few older games I have played from a female’s perspective!

And not only is Zelda already created, expanded, and real to the story, but she already has an amazing super power – the triforce of wisdom.  How easy would it be to make more difficult, challenging puzzles focusing on the idea that Zelda has to use her triforce of wisdom to defeat them?  Instead of the regularly-encountered boss, why not bosses with a big twist, requiring some serious forethought and skills to defeat them?

Don’t you guys agree that the absolute best remastered version of Ocarina of Time would be to include the original mode from Link’s point of view and a newly released mode from Zelda aka Sheik’s point of view?  It’s not like she sat around doing nothing for 7 years while Link was sealed away!  So what awesome shenanigans did she save Hyrule from?  Or to have a new Skyward Sword utilizing her very particular role at the temples, with new maps, puzzles, and her own set of bosses?

So, in my opinion, we don’t need a new female, playable character in the Zelda series.  We don’t even (in fact, please don’t!) need to make Link into a girl.  Nintendo just needs to jump on the idea they’ve already started and use the amazing character they already have. Let’s make a new Legend of Zelda about Zelda.

So what do you guys think?  Don’t be afraid to weigh in!  I’d love to hear your opinions.